Featured Events

The Division of Equity and Inclusion hosts and partners with many others on campus to host events throughout the year.

 Heritage and History Months 
#DAPTalks
African American Workshop and Lecture Series  ♦  Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Awards
Implicit Bias Workshops  ♦  Showcase Oregon  ♦  ECC First Fridays 
 Event Funding Requests


Bystander Upstander Workshop, Sun, Mar 17, 1-4pm, Eugene Friends Meetinghouse

Battling Implicit in Education: Is it Really Unconscious?, Thurs, March 14, 4pm. Beall Concert

César Chávez Celebration, Thurs, Apr 4, 5-7pm, Hamlin Middle School

 

 

Mar 19
Tyler Young - People of Ecuador7:00 a.m.

The EMU Visual Arts Team welcomes UO alumnus Tyler Young’s second exhibit in the Aperture Gallery: People of Ecuador.Tyler completed his Bachelor of Science...
March 1–29
Erb Memorial Union (EMU), Aperture Gallery

The EMU Visual Arts Team welcomes UO alumnus Tyler Young’s second exhibit in the Aperture Gallery: People of Ecuador.Tyler completed his Bachelor of Science degree in Environmental Studies in the summer of '18. Tyler's "Hiking to The Enchantments, Washington" exhibit will be on-view through mid-February in the gallery. Artist's statement:

People of Ecuador

The People of Ecuador. They are different from the places, in fact, separate entirely. One can travel, see the world, take in the sights, the sounds, eat the food, and take the tour, but getting to know someone is an ordeal. Listening takes courage, and time. It cannot be done while traveling. Being stationary, absorbed in the moment and intent on communicating with another allows you to listen. Many people say to live in the moment, but there is no other way of being. No one exists in the past or the future, there is only the now. This moment, however fleeting will actively shape what’s to come. This burden is most difficult enough, let alone adding another person into the mix. Altogether separate morals, ideals, religious beliefs, friends, family, problems, and worries, why in the world would anyone want to inexorably tie their own life into another, even for a moment? And  It is harder than it seems, especially when there may be a language barrier.

 

Sometimes I chose not to. I ignored people, walked away, remained silent, or pretended not to understand, missed opportunities… everyone has their limits. As I spent more and more time in Ecuador, I began to become comfortable, I knew my way around several cities, towns, and communities, I could navigate my way on foot from Quito’s Basilica to La Plaza De Foch without the help of a friendly taxi driver who would sometimes take the long way around with Americans. I knew the bus routes, and could make my way from the Andean Cloud Forests to the Amazon where I spent most of my time. I knew more about medicinal, and fruit bearing plants than a few of the locals, but substantially less than the few who were in the know. It was somewhat of a lost art which I longed for. But I didn’t live there, I was only there filming for a documentary. I was a traveler. I could easily pay the dollar per hour fares on the bus, I was American after all. Eventually I got by with my Spanish, without trouble, without fear. Soon enough, no one realized I wasn’t a local, and after about 8 months of my year there, I certainly felt like one. I began going through the motions, doing things without the want or need for more deeply connected interactions between myself and the locals. No one would second guess my doings like they might some of my lighter skinned friends. I don’t look American after all.

 

They were interested to hear where I was from, they thought I was Colombian, or Brazilian, my presence often brought a smile to their face. Once we spoke for more than brief interaction, they realized I wasn’t a local, and they began to treat me as such. It’s funny how we might more easily connect with an outsider than an insider. Everyone has their own way of connecting. I was offered meals, and places to stay, I was encouraged to try locally grown coffee and chocolate. I did not like the fried maduros, I preferred the patacones, I didn't try the cuy, I was examined with a microscope, I was glanced over as a tourist, I was robbed, I was drugged, I was chased and bitten by rabid dogs, by mosquitos, and by the local flirts. Someone asked me to marry their daughter, I laughed, he laughed too. I asked to take his photograph.

 

Enjoy. 

 

@ TylerisYoung

Mar 28
Minoru Yasui Day 2019 Celebration4:00 p.m.

The UO School of Law is proud to host the Oregon Nikkei Endowment and its Minoru Yasui Legacy Project as they present an afternoon of events and activities in...
March 28 4:00 p.m.–6:30 p.m.
White Stag Block, Room 142

The UO School of Law is proud to host the Oregon Nikkei Endowment and its Minoru Yasui Legacy Project as they present an afternoon of events and activities in honor of the life and work of UO School of Law alumnus and civil rights pioneer, Minoru Yasui.  The celebration begins with an opening greeting the Japanese American Historical Plaza along the Portland waterfront at 4:00pm and is followed by a panel discussion and reception directly across the street at the UO Portland White Stag Block, featuring attorneys from the Minoru Yasui, Gordon Hirabayashi, and Fred Korematsu coram nobis legal cases.  The celebration continues later that evening with a 7:30pm screening of the film Never Give Up! Minoru Yasui and the Fight for Justice at the Oregon Historical Society.

Apr 1
Anti-Semitism in White Nationalism6:00 p.m.

“Confronting Anti-Semitism in the Age of White Nationalism,” is a recorded talk by Eric Ward of Western States Center, with a talk by Rabbi Ruhi Sophia Motzkin...
April 1 6:00 p.m.–8:30 p.m.
1685 W 13th Ave, Eugene, OR 97402, USA

“Confronting Anti-Semitism in the Age of White Nationalism,” is a recorded talk by Eric Ward of Western States Center, with a talk by Rabbi Ruhi Sophia Motzkin Rubenstein of Temple Beth Israel.

White Nationalism is a growing threat locally, nationally and globally. SURJ-SE and CALC are presenting a film series to enhance our understanding of, and our ability to confront this serious menace to civil and inclusive society.

We strongly encourage you to attend the full series of events, as the community conversation will be developing throughout.

Each film screening will be followed by a discussion. 

Apr 1
Understanding & Confronting White Nationalism6:00 p.m.

White Nationalism is a growing threat locally, nationally, and globally. This film series will enhance our understanding of and our ability to confront this serious menace to...
March 11–April 1
Please register for information: www.universe.com/WNS

White Nationalism is a growing threat locally, nationally, and globally. This film series will enhance our understanding of and our ability to confront this serious menace to civil and inclusive society. Each film screening will be followed by a discussion. We strongly encourage you to attend the full series of events, as the community conversation will be developing throughout.

Presented by Showing Up for Racial Justice (SURJ) and Community Alliance of Lane County. 

Apr 4
iCésar Chávez, Presente!5:00 p.m.

Springfield's 17th Annual Celebration in honor of César Chávez/La 17ava Celebracion Anual en Springfield en honor a César...
April 4 5:00 p.m.–7:00 p.m.
Hamlin Middle School

Springfield's 17th Annual Celebration in honor of César Chávez/La 17ava Celebracion Anual en Springfield en honor a César Chávez


Mariachi del Sol y otros/and others
Rifas/ Raffles
Premios por servicio y apoyo a los derechos humanos/Service and human right awards
Libros para las primeras 100 familias/books for the first 100 families


 

Apr 7
The 2019 ACT-SO Competition4:00 p.m.

ACT-SO is an acronym for Academic, Cultural, Technological and Scientific Olympics. ACT-SO is a major youth initiative of the NAACP. ACT-SO provides a forum through which youth of...
April 7 4:00 p.m.–6:00 p.m.
Hult Center for the Performing Arts

ACT-SO is an acronym for Academic, Cultural, Technological and Scientific Olympics. ACT-SO is a major youth initiative of the NAACP. ACT-SO provides a forum through which youth of African descent demonstrate academic, artistic and scientific prowess and expertise, thereby gaining the same recognition often only reserved for entertainers and athletes. 

The National Act-So experience can be a defining event for our youth and we encourage participation and support for this unique opportunity! 

Apr 8
Justin Driver: "Are Public Schools Becoming Constitution-Free Zones?" 11:45 a.m.

How have courts evaluated corporal punishment, random drug tests, strip searches, and transgender students accessing restrooms?  Justin Driver, Harry N. Wyatt Professor of...
April 8 11:45 a.m.–1:00 p.m.
Erb Memorial Union, Redwood Auditorium

How have courts evaluated corporal punishment, random drug tests, strip searches, and transgender students accessing restrooms?  Justin Driver, Harry N. Wyatt Professor of Law at the University of Chicago Law School, will analyze these and other legal questions regarding public schools and their place in American society.

Driver is the author of The Schoolhouse Gate: Public Education, the Supreme Court, and the Battle for the American Mind, where he “…maintains that since the 1970s, the Supreme Court has regularly abdicated responsibility in protecting students’ rights, risking transforming public schools into Constitution-free zones and in turn jeopardizing our basic constitutional order.”

The Schoolhouse Gate was a Washington Post Notable Book of the Year and a New York Times Book Review Editors’ Choice. Driver is a recipient of the American Society for Legal History’s William Nelson Cromwell Article Prize,  has a distinguished publication record in the nation’s leading law reviews, and has written extensively for lay audiences, including pieces in Slate, The Atlantic, The New York Times, The Washington Post, and The New Republic, where he was a contributing editor.

RSVP REQUESTED

Apr 9
Six Conversations About Race, Culture & Equity5:30 p.m.

In this series, you will build the necessary skills to work successfully with the challenges and opportunities presented by the increasing racial and cultural diversity and...
April 9–May 14
Wesley Foundation Center

In this series, you will build the necessary skills to work successfully with the challenges and opportunities presented by the increasing racial and cultural diversity and multicultural dynamics of our communities, schools, organizations and agencies. 

The sessions will be led by Dr. Johnny Lake, Educator and Advocate for Children. These sessions will develop a learning community for collaboration around institutional and community equity.

The series is based on who is in the room and what conversation wants to happen; we plan the activities based on participant input. We're encouraging folks to register with co-workers, parents or allies from their organizations and schools.

Proposed topics include:
- Defining Identity, Race, Culture, Ethnicity and Other Terms
- How Identity Works  Socio-Political and Socio-Historical Contexts
- Understanding Stereotypes, Prejudice, Discrimination, and Racism
- Learning about Advocacy, Equity, and Social Justice
- Building Community  Working Beyond Race and Identity Issues

"When we commit to a course of multicultural development, we commit to equity and justice, and we also commit to learn, grow and change." -Dr. Johnny Lake 

Apr 9
We Are Neighbors: The touring play6:30 p.m.

A half-hour, touring version of the play has been produced in nearly 20 schools, places of worship and community events across Eugene and Springfield since March 2018. The...
April 9 6:30 p.m.
Fern Ridge Library

A half-hour, touring version of the play has been produced in nearly 20 schools, places of worship and community events across Eugene and Springfield since March 2018.

The half-hour play will also be followed by a community discussion in which members of the audience are welcome to share their feedback, experience and observations.

The play will be followed by an Integration Network presentation on the political, historical, economic or cultural dimensions of immigration. For more information, email laura@fernridgelibrary.org

Apr 10
HOPES Conferencenoon

HOPES[25] will take flight April 10-13, and we will come together from various backgrounds and disciplines to discuss this year’s theme, Destructive Idealism. Our way...
April 10–13
Lawrence Hall



HOPES[25] will take flight April 10-13, and we will come together from various backgrounds and disciplines to discuss this year’s theme, Destructive Idealism.

Our way of life is the product of decades of ideals—growth, individualism, the American Dream. While these ideals have inspired hard work and innovation, too often they lead to mass scale disruption of our environment. Like a double-edged sword, our ideals separate us from the reality of current issues and we respond with devastating complacency.

Destructive Idealism is both an attack on complacency and a pledge to resilience. In its 25th year, HOPES revisits the visions of past generations. We call for resilient thinking that transcends scales, anticipates challenges, and unrelentingly pursues a dynamic and equitable future.

To keep up-to-date as the conference approaches, follow us on Instagram: @hopesconference.


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