Featured Events

The Division of Equity and Inclusion hosts and partners with many others on campus to host events throughout the year.

 Heritage and History Months 
 African American Workshop and Lecture Series  
 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Awards
Multicultural Calendar
#DAPTalks ♦ Implicit Bias Workshops  ♦  Showcase Oregon  ♦  ECC First Fridays 
 Event Funding Requests


 

Sep 19
Racing to Change: Oregon's Civil Rights Years—The Eugene Story11:00 a.m.

  Racing to Change chronicles the civil rights movement in Eugene, Oregon, during the 1960s and 1970s—a time of great upheaval, conflict, and...
October 12 2019–December 31 2020
Museum of Natural and Cultural History

 

Racing to Change chronicles the civil rights movement in Eugene, Oregon, during the 1960s and 1970s—a time of great upheaval, conflict, and celebration as new voices clashed with traditional organizations of power. Co-developed by the Museum of Natural and Cultural History and Oregon Black Pioneers, the exhibit illuminates legacies of racism and the unceasing efforts of Oregon's Black communities to bring about change. 

Through photographs, recorded interviews, and historical archives, Racing to Change explores how racist policies and attitudes created a pressing need for bold civil rights activism in Eugene. Firsthand accounts from movement organizers, former UO students, elected officials, and other members of Oregon's black communities paint a vivid picture of the area's past, and urge us to take part in building a more just future. 

The museum is open Wednesdays through Sundays from 11:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.  In accordance with university and state public health mandates, we will require everyone onsite to wear masks or other face coverings and maintain a distance of six feet from anyone outside their households. 

Public hours and safety protocols are subject to change based on guidance from the University of Oregon and the Oregon Health Authority. Please stay tuned to our COVID-19 Updates page for developing information.

Sep 22
Sexual Asssault Support Services LGBTQIA+ Group 5:00 p.m.

Sexual Assault Support Services (SASS) has a support group for members of the LGBTQIA+ community (18+) who have experienced any form of sexual violence in the past or present....
January 14 2020–June 28 2022
Sexual Assault Support Services (SASS)

Sexual Assault Support Services (SASS) has a support group for members of the LGBTQIA+ community (18+) who have experienced any form of sexual violence in the past or present. SASS services are always free. http://sass-lane.org/

SASS's LGBTQIA+ Support Group

Meets 2nd and 4th Tuesdays of the month from 5-6:30 p.m.

For any self-identified members of the queer community age 18+ who have experienced sexual violence. 

Drop in. No registration needed. SASS services are always free. 

Sep 28
Exhibit: Timber Culture7:00 a.m.

The Timber Culture exhibit, curated by Maxville Heritage Interpretive Center, offers unique views into the histories of logging, migration, and both...
September 28–November 6
Erb Memorial Union (EMU), Aperture Gallery

The Timber Culture exhibit, curated by Maxville Heritage Interpretive Center, offers unique views into the histories of logging, migration, and both segregation and integration in Oregon history. Through portraits that range from intimate to formal, the images of people demonstrate that this history was lived by individual people who came together to build relationships and community together. Images of buildings and work equipment ground viewers in time and place, and the captions both provide context and add information about people and places not in the pictures. The exhibit is effective for both fostering quiet contemplation and generating conversation, making it a great fit for all public places."

Oct 6
Part-Time Job Fair10:00 a.m.

Looking for part-time work? Check out the possibilities at the Part-time Job Fair during week 2, Tuesday, October 6th, 2020, 10am to 2pm. Both on-and-off campus employers...
October 6 10:00 a.m.–2:00 a.m.

Looking for part-time work? Check out the possibilities at the Part-time Job Fair during week 2, Tuesday, October 6th, 2020, 10am to 2pm. Both on-and-off campus employers will be taking applications. The fair will include 30-minute group sessions open to all students and 10-minute one-on-one quick interviews for students who meet employers' predesignated criteria. Spots are limited, so be sure to register early to grab time with your favorite employers! Registration will be open to students on September 1st. Join us on Handshake: https://uoregon.joinhandshake.com/career_fairs/16651/student_preview?token=9-6dEUCW7HNA9LJKoobmRoueNz0_XoSefbMBfRbY45fshZqGRlqxfg

Oct 7
The Social Life of DNA: Race, Reparations, and Reconciliation after the Genome, with Alondra Nelson4:00 p.m.

Register for this event Alondra Nelson is president of the Social Science Research Council. She is also the Harold F. Linder Chair and Professor at the Institute for Advanced...
October 7 4:00 p.m.

Register for this event

Alondra Nelson is president of the Social Science Research Council. She is also the Harold F. Linder Chair and Professor at the Institute for Advanced Study, an independent center for theoretical research and intellectual inquiry. She was previously a professor of sociology at Columbia University, where she served as the inaugural Dean of Social Science.

Nelson began her academic career on the faculty of Yale University and there was recognized with several honors, including the Poorvu Prize for interdisciplinary teaching excellence. An award-winning sociologist, Nelson has published widely-acclaimed books and articles exploring science, technology, medicine, and social inequality.

Nelson is author of several books, including The Social Life of DNA: Race, Reparations, and Reconciliation after the Genome, a finalist for the Hurston-Wright Foundation Award for Nonfiction, and a Wall Street Journal favorite book.

Nelson has contributed to national policy discussions on inequality and about the social implications of new technologies, including artificial intelligence, big data, and human gene editing. She serves on the boards of the Data & Society Research Institute, the Center for Research Libraries, and The Teagle Foundation, as well as the board for African-American programs at Monticello. She also is a member of the board of directors of the Brotherhood/Sister Sol, a Harlem-based youth development organization. Her essays, reviews, and commentary have appeared in The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal, Science, Le Nouvel Observateur, The Boston Globe, and on National Public Radio, The New Yorker Radio Hour, and PBS Newshour, among other venues. 

This event is sponsored by the Wayne Morse Center for Law and Politics as a part of its 2019-21 theme of inquiry, Science, Policy, and the Public. It is part of the African American Workshop and Lecture Series, which is sponsored by the Office of the President and coordinated by the Division of Equity and Inclusion. It is also part of the Lorwin Lectureship on Civil Rights and Civil Liberties. 

Oct 20
Defending Democracy: A Conversation with Eric H. Holder, Jr., 82nd Attorney General of the United States (2009-2015)noon

Register here A leading progressive voice, Eric Holder has been instrumental in shaping the direction of the United States on a number of critical issues at the...
October 20 noon

Register here

A leading progressive voice, Eric Holder has been instrumental in shaping the direction of the United States on a number of critical issues at the intersection of law and policy. He served in the Obama Administration as the 82nd Attorney General of the United States (2009 to 2015), the third longest serving Attorney General in U.S. history and the first African American to hold that office. A staunch advocate for civil rights and voting rights, Holder is active in gerrymandering reform as Chair of the National Democratic Redistricting Committee. He is a partner at Covington & Burling LLP, in Washington, D.C. 

This event the keynote for the Wayne Morse Center's 20th Anniversary Celebration and is sponsored by the Center's Public Affairs Speaker Series. It's part of the African American Workshop and Lecture Series, which is sponsored by the Office of the President and coordinated by the Division of Equity and Inclusion. It is also part of the Lorwin Lectureship on Civil Rights and Civil Liberties. It is cosponsored by the UO Political Science Department; the UO School of Law; the UO Division of Equity and Inclusion; and KLCC, public radio.

Oct 20
BE Help! with Ebony Morgan6:00 p.m.

The UO BEseries is proud to host Ebony Morgan as our first speaker of the 2020-21 speaker series! Ebony Morgan is a crisis worker for CAHOOTS and a registered nurse, driven by a...
October 20 6:00 p.m.–7:30 p.m.
online, Instagram

The UO BEseries is proud to host Ebony Morgan as our first speaker of the 2020-21 speaker series! Ebony Morgan is a crisis worker for CAHOOTS and a registered nurse, driven by a passion for addressing the effects of socioeconomic inequalities and structural racism on public health and safety. CAHOOTS (Crisis Assistance Helping Out On The Streets) provides mobile crisis intervention 24/7 in the Eugene-Springfield Metro area. CAHOOTS has recently received national attention as cities search for alternatives to policing. Ebony will discuss her work with CAHOOTS and nursing as well as her pathway to her present work. Please join us!

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