Featured Events

The Division of Equity and Inclusion hosts and partners with many others on campus to host events throughout the year.

 Heritage and History Months 
 African American Workshop and Lecture Series  
 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Awards
Multicultural Calendar
#DAPTalks ♦ Implicit Bias Workshops  ♦  Showcase Oregon  ♦  ECC First Fridays 
 Event Funding Requests


 

Dr. Angela Rose Black 
Founder and CEO
Mindfulness for the People

Keynote:
Emotional Reparations as Racial Justice Work 

October 9, 11am-1pm
Ford Alumni Center, Giustina Ballroom

RSVP NOW

Fireside Chats:

A DEI
CACE: Campus and Community Engagement Event 

 

Oct 13
Resistance as Power: A Curatorial Response to Under the Feet of Jesus12:00 a.m.

The JSMA’s fourth “Common Seeing” exhibition supports the UO’s 2019-20 “Common Reading” of Under the Feet of Jesus by Helena Maria...
September 7 2019–February 23 2020
Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art (JSMA)

The JSMA’s fourth “Common Seeing” exhibition supports the UO’s 2019-20 “Common Reading” of Under the Feet of Jesus by Helena Maria Viramontes. In the book, the resilient protagonist,13-year-old Estrella, works in the hot California grape fields while navigating the realities of first love, financial struggle, family separation, and illness. For more information about the “Common Reading,” including upcoming university events, visit commonreading.uoregon.edu. Two special loans from the Smithsonian American Art Museum (SAAM) by artists Emanuel Martinez and Domingo Ulloa anchor the exhibition. Martinez created Farm Workers’ Altar (1967) for the Catholic Mass held in Delano, California, at which labor activist César Chávez broke his twenty five-day fast in 1968. Ulloa, “The Father of Chicano Art,” painted Braceros (1960) after visiting a labor camp in Holtville, California. From 1942 through 1964, the U.S. government invited agricultural workers from Mexico for limited-duration assignments to relieve the worker shortage caused by World War II. Ulloa presented a sobering view of the reality of life for these braceros (from the Spanish for “one who works using his arms,” implying manual labor), who experienced poor working conditions, crowded living quarters, and other challenges while employed in the United States. These special loans provide historical and cultural touchstones for Viramontes’s 1995 novel and contemporary works from the JSMA’s permanent collection, including recent acquisitions by Ester Hernández, Victor Maldonado, and Lilliam Nieves.

 

Resistance as Power: A Curatorial Response to Under the Feet of Jesus is one in a series of American art exhibitions created through a multi-year, multi-institutional partnership formed by the Smithsonian American Art Museum as part of the Art Bridges + Terra Foundation Initiative.

Oct 13
Social Justice Revisited: Remembering, Revisiting, Resisting 1968-2018 by Betty LaDuke10:00 a.m.

Artist statement Social Justice Revisited spans five decades of select artwork (1968 – 2019): remembering, reliving, resisting. This series raises questions about personal...
October 1–November 8
Erb Memorial Union (EMU), Adell McMillan Gallery

Artist statement Social Justice Revisited spans five decades of select artwork (1968 – 2019): remembering, reliving, resisting. This series raises questions about personal and political relationships concerning how we live, what we have done, and what we need to do individually and collectively for peace and global survival. Biography BETTY LADUKE (American, b. 1933) resides in Ashland, Ore., where she is professor of art emeritus at Southern Oregon University, having taught there from 1964-1996. Born to emigrant parents in the Bronx, N.Y., at age 16 she was accepted into the High School of Music and Art in New York City. Upon graduation, she continued her education with scholarships at the University of Denver, the Cleveland Institute of Art, and the Instituto Allende in San Miguel de Allende, Mexico. In 1963, she graduated from California State University in Los Angeles with a special secondary art teaching credential and a master’s degree in printmaking. LaDuke has exhibited widely around the United States including: the Schneider Museum of Art, Ashland, Oregon, the Brauer Museum of Art, Valparaiso University, Indiana; University Museum of New Mexico State University, Las Cruces; Dallas Museum of Art, Texas; The Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago; Chattanooga African American Museum, Tennessee; Indianapolis Art Center, Indiana; the Hallie Ford Museum of Art, Oregon, and the Albany Museum of Art, Georgia. Her work is represented in public collections including Jordon Schnitzer Museum of Art, Eugene, Oregon; Brauer Museum of Art, Valparaiso, Ind.; Rensselaer Newman Foundation and Cultural Center, Troy, New York; Heifer International, Little Rock, Ark.; Portland Art Museum, Ore.; the Rogue Valley International Airport, Medford, Oregon and the Rhode Island school of Design, Museum of Art, Providence, R.I. LaDuke has received numerous awards such as the Oregon Governor’s Award in the Arts (1993) and the National Art Education Association’s Ziegfeld Award for distinguished international leadership (1996).

Oct 13
Blake Little: Photographs from the Gay Rodeo11:00 a.m.

On view Saturday, September 7, 2019 through Sunday, January 19, 2020 Experience the grit and daring of North America’s gay rodeo circuit. Blake Little’s arresting...
September 7 2019–January 19 2020
Museum of Natural and Cultural History

On view Saturday, September 7, 2019 through Sunday, January 19, 2020

Experience the grit and daring of North America’s gay rodeo circuit. Blake Little’s arresting black-and-white photographs explore the athleticism, artistry, and camaraderie of a time-honored LGBTQIA tradition while celebrating the complex nature of identity and community in the West.

A program of ExhibitsUSA, a national division of Mid-America Arts Alliance, and the National Endowment for the Arts.

Oct 13
GRAND OPENING WEEKEND! Racing to Change: Oregon's Civil Rights Years - The Eugene Story11:00 a.m.

Racing to Change chronicles the civil rights movement in Eugene, Oregon, during the 1960s and 1970s—a time of great upheaval, conflict, and celebration...
October 12–13
Museum of Natural and Cultural History

Racing to Change chronicles the civil rights movement in Eugene, Oregon, during the 1960s and 1970s—a time of great upheaval, conflict, and celebration as new voices clashed with traditional organizations of power. Co-developed by the Museum of Natural and Cultural History and Oregon Black Pioneers, the exhibit illuminates legacies of racism and the unceasing efforts of Oregon's Black communities to bring about change. 

Through photographs, recorded interviews, and historical archives, Racing to Change explores how racist policies and attitudes created a pressing need for bold civil rights activism in Eugene. Firsthand accounts from movement organizers, former UO students, elected officials, and other members of Oregon's black communities paint a vivid picture of the area's past, and urge us to take part in building a more just future.

Join members of Oregon Black Pioneers for a grand opening celebration of the landmark exhibit. Admission is free. Visit mnch.uoregon.edu for the event schedule. 

 

Oct 14
OUTList Debut12:00 a.m.

The OUTList is a list of UO students, faculty, staff, and alumni who wish to publicly acknowledge and celebrate that they are lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer,...
October 14 12:00 a.m.

The OUTList is a list of UO students, faculty, staff, and alumni who wish to publicly acknowledge and celebrate that they are lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, questioning, intersex, asexual, aromantic, agender, and/or allies (LGBTQIA+).

The list will appear in the form of an advertisement in the Daily Emerald during the week of October 14 to correspond with National Coming Out Day on October 11.

Submissions must be received by 8:00 a.m. on Wednesday, October 2, 2019.

Oct 14
Studying Republican Vietnam: Issues, Challenges, and Prospects8:00 a.m.

Scholarly interest in the Republic of Vietnam (RVN) has surged in the last decade. The conventional wisdom in Western scholarship until recently was closely in line with communist...
October 14 8:00 a.m.–5:30 p.m.
Erb Memorial Union (EMU), Redwood Auditorium

Scholarly interest in the Republic of Vietnam (RVN) has surged in the last decade. The conventional wisdom in Western scholarship until recently was closely in line with communist propaganda, either ignoring the RVN or portraying it as an American creation in the US global struggle against communism. In this narrative, we explore these ideas.

Oct 14
Indigenous Peoples' Day11:00 a.m.

Special Monday hours: The Museum of Natural and Cultural History will be open with FREE admission in honor of Indigenous Peoples' Day! Come celebrate 14,000...
October 14 11:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.
Museum of Natural and Cultural History

Special Monday hours: The Museum of Natural and Cultural History will be open with FREE admission in honor of Indigenous Peoples' Day! Come celebrate 14,000 years of Native culture in Oregon—from the First Americans at Paisley Caves to the dynamic cultures of today's Tribes. 

Oct 14
GEO Study Abroad Drop-In Advising1:30 p.m.

Are you interested in studying abroad? Want to find out how to fit it in your academic plan? Not sure how to get started? Come speak to a GEO Study Abroad expert on...
October 1–December 13
Oregon Hall, 300W


Are you interested in studying abroad?
Want to find out how to fit it in your academic plan?
Not sure how to get started?


Come speak to a GEO Study Abroad expert on steps to make it a reality! If you know where you want to go or the program you are interested in, call 541-346-3207 today and set up a personalized 30-min appointment.

Contact geoinfo@uoregon.edu with any questions or search programs at geo.uoregon.edu.

Oct 14
Daryl Baldwin Talk 6:00 p.m.

On the occasion of Indigenous Peoples Day during 2019 declared by the United Nations as the International Year of Indigenous Languages, the Graduate Linguists of Oregon...
October 14 6:00 p.m.–8:20 p.m.
Straub Hall, 156

On the occasion of Indigenous Peoples Day during 2019 declared by the United Nations as the International Year of Indigenous Languages, the Graduate Linguists of Oregon Student Society (GLOSS) in collaboration with the Northwest Indian Language Institute, will be hosting a public talk by Daryl Baldwin, a citizen of the Miami Tribe of Oklahoma and Director of the Myaamia Center at Miami University. A 2016 MacArthur Fellow, Baldwin has been an intellectual leader in the revitalization of the Myaamia language, a language that was dormant for several decades after losing its native speakers. Today, the Myaamia language is undergoing a vibrant process of revitalization which, as Baldwin will explain, is strongly grounded on a long-standing and mutually strengthening relationship between the Miami Tribe of Oklahoma and Miami University. You may learn more about Daryl Baldwin at https://miamioh.edu/myaamia-center/about/staff-faculty-affiliates/baldwin/and https://www.macfound.org/fellows/955/ .

Oct 14
Department of Art Visiting Artist Lecture Series: Hank Willis Thomas6:00 p.m.

Hank Willis Thomas: “All Things Being Equal…” Throughout his career, Hank Willis Thomas (American, born 1976) has addressed the visual systems that...
October 14 6:00 p.m.
Lawrence Hall, Room 115

Hank Willis Thomas: “All Things Being Equal…”

Throughout his career, Hank Willis Thomas (American, born 1976) has addressed the visual systems that perpetuate inequality and bias in bold, skillfully crafted works. Through photographs, sculpture, video, and collaborative public art projects, he invites us to consider the role of popular culture in instituting discrimination and how art can raise critical awareness in the ongoing struggle for social justice and civil rights.

Hank Willis Thomas is a conceptual artist working primarily with themes related to perspective identity, commodity, media, and popular culture. His work is included in numerous public collections including the Museum of Modern Art in New York; the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; the Brooklyn Museum, New York; the High Museum of Art, Atlanta, and the National Gallery of Art, Washington D.C.

His collaborative projects include Question Bridge: Black Males,In Search Of The Truth (The Truth Booth), and& For Freedoms, the first artist-run initiative for art and civic engagement. In 2017, For Freedoms was awarded the ICP Infinity Award for New Media and Online Platform. Thomas is also a recipient of the Guggenheim Fellowship (2018), the AIMIA | AGO Photography Prize (2017), the Soros Equality Fellowship (2017), and is a member of the New York City Public Design Commission

This lecture is made possible by a grant from the Division of Equity and Inclusion, the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art and the Department of Art.

more events